PUBLICATIONS

pub1A SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY OF COMMUNICATION: THE SELF-ORGANIZATION OF THE COMPANY KNOWLEDGE-BASED

Authors: Nafarrate Torres, Loet Leydesdorff
Publisher: Mexico: Universidad Iberoamerica, 2025, Edition 1
ISBN: 978-1607-427-343-7 (hbk)
Also available in Spanish

In this work, Leydesdorff takes up the theory of the structure of Giddens, the theory of communicative action of Habermas, and the proposal of Luhmann of self-organization of social systems, and thus seeks to examine whether companies can, and propose Luhmann, be considered as autopoietic organizations, ie, if societies are organizations with the ability to create self-regulatory systems for themselves. The importance of an analysis of this nature is that its acceptance would direct contradiction to modern sociological tradition, which sees social regulation depend on the individual capacity of each individual to act in their world. Loet Leydesdorff, Doctor in Sociology and professor in the department of communication studies at the University of Amsterdam, has published texts of social networks, philosophy of science, sociology of innovation and scientometrics.

pub2OPEN INNOVATION ESSENTIALS FOR SMALL AND MEDIUM ENTERPRISES

Authors: Luca Escoffier , Adriano La Vopa, Phyllis Speser , and Daniel Satinsky
Publisher: Business Expert Press, 2016
ISBN: 9781631572425 (hbk)
ISBN: 9781631572432 (ebk)

Open Innovation Essentials for Small and Medium Enterprises: A Guide to Help Entrepreneurs in Adopting the Open Innovation Paradigm in Their Business is a collaborative practical guide. It is written expressly for entrepreneurs and managers in SME’s, whose perspective and approach to open innovation differs from large companies.

pub3THE TRIPLE HELIX OF INNOVATION IN ISRAEL

Editors: Professor Gili S Drori with Professor Henry Etzkowitz
Contributors: Ohad Barkai, Amy Ben-Dor, Navah Berger, Alexandr Bucevschi,
Noga Caspi, Avida Netivi
Publisher: The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
The-Helix-Model-of-Innovation-in-Israel.pdf

This book is the outcome of an annual undergraduate seminar “the sociology of innovation, entrepreneurship, and networks,” offered at the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem during the 2011-2012 academic year. Captivated by the systemic and relational perspective encapsulated in the Triple Helix model, outlined in the 1990s by Henry Etzkowitz, we decided to evaluate the applicability of this model to Israel’s innovation system. We quickly came to the conclusion that Israel’s celebrated innovation system is more complex than the model outlines: whereas the Triple Helix focuses on the triadic relations among industry, government, and academia, in Israel additional “helices” are integral strands of innovation. Based on this critique, we specified such additional helices that are most relevant for Israel’s innovation economy and we divided the research of these various helices among us. The outcome offered here is, therefore, an exploratory study of the institutional components of Israel’s innovation system and of the integrative relations among these components. In this way, our joint work is in conversation with several contemporary social science discussions: on national innovation systems, on Israel’s innovation economy, and on networks and organizational hybridity.

STUDENT ENTREPRENEURSHIP: DEMOGRAPHICS, COMPETENCES AND OBSTACLES TECHNICAL REPORT – ALMALAUREA CONSORTIUM, 2016

Authors: Fini R, Meoli A, Sobrero M, Ghiselli S, Ferrante F
http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2740541

In this report, the authors use a population-based approach to explore the entrepreneurial activities of 61,115 students, alumni of the sixty -four Italian universities that are members of the Almalaurea consortium, in the second half of 2014. Data were collected through a newly developed section of the Almalaurea survey, which will be consolidated in future rounds to allow to continue mapping student entrepreneurship in Italy and to provide robust empirical evidence to longitudinal analyses. The results show that student entrepreneurs represent 2.7% of the sample, whereas nascent entrepreneurs and non-entrepreneurs account for 3.8% and 93.5%, respectively. The authors profile and compare the three groups across dimensions such as demographics, mobility, field of study, sources of stimuli and competences, perceived obstacles, and support for entrepreneurship. The results shed light on the timely and relevant, yet understudied, phenomenon of student entrepreneurship, offering implications for both policy and practice.

For more information on the research project: https://events.unibo.it/student-entrepreneurship-italy/

thjTRIPLE HELIX JOURNAL

A Journal of University-Industry-Government Innovation and Entrepreneurship

ISSN: 2197-1927
(electronic version)
http://link.springer.com/journal/40604

Recently published papers:

Hidden mediator roles of university spin-offs in Triple Helix networks
Marina van Geenhuizen, Qing Ye and Mozhdeh Takeri

The Triple Helix frame for small- and medium-sized enterprises for innovation and development of offshore wind energy
Tove Brink and Svend Ole Madsen

Expanding the vision of entrepreneurial universities: a case study of UNIRIO in Brazil
Mariza Almeida, Douglas Santos, Luiziana Aragão, Gabriel Nogueira, Andrea Bonifácio, Bruno Simões and Branca Terra

Impact of competitions for ideas and business plans on firm creation and development of entrepreneurial university: case study of the IPC in Portugal
João P C Marques

The Triple Helix after communism: Russia and China compared
Harley Balzer and Jon Askonas